Teaching Social Skills to Students with Autism: A Video Modeling Social Stories Approach

Sarah Halle, Chris Ninness, Sharon K. Ninness, David Lawson

Abstract


Abstract

The present study evaluates the effects of a social story procedure as developed by Gray (2010). The social story alone was presented in a video modeled format to four middle school students who were eligible for the special education autism criteria and who were instructed primarily in a public middle school general education setting. Using a multiple baseline design across participants in their natural school setting, this study found consistent improvements in all participants’ social responses when greeted by peer helpers. During the follow-up phase, participants’ prosocial greeting responses remained consistent with intervention phase responses. One of the primary purposes of this study was to find more reliable evidence-based treatments and outcomes for those individuals afflicted with autism, a growing population within our society. Importantly, this study placed particular emphasis on a social story protocol as employed in the absence of other concurrent treatments. Participants were exposed to a video modeling protocol within a natural school setting. Social stories videos were focused on peer-interactive greeting behaviors. Techniques for establishing generalization of prosocial peer-interactive behaviors are discussed, and strategies for observing students during follow-up conditions are described.One of the primary purposes of this study was to find more reliable evidence-based treatments and outcomes for those afflicted with autism, a growing population within our society. Importantly, this study placed particular emphasis on the social stories protocol as employed in the absence of other concurrent treatments. Participants were exposed to a video modeling protocol within a natural school setting. Social stories videos were focused on peer-interactive greeting behaviors. Techniques for establishing generalization of prosocial peer-interactive behaviors are discussed, and strategies for observing students during follow-up conditions are described.


Keywords


social stories, autism, social communication skills, video modeling, peer-helpers, natural settings, generalization

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/bsi.v25i0.6190



Published by the University of Illinois at Chicago Library

And Behaviorists for Social Responsibility