Youth, privacy and online media: Framing the right to privacy in public policy-making

Gry Hasselbalch Lapenta, Rikke Frank Jørgensen

Abstract


The right to privacy is a fundamental human right defined in international and regional human rights instruments. As such it has been included as a core component of key legislature and policy proceedings throughout the brief history of the World Wide Web. While it is generally recognized in public policy making that the right to privacy is challenged in new ways in a structurally transformed online public sphere, the way in which it has been framed does not seem to acknowledge this transformation. This paper therefore argues for a reformulation of “online privacy” in the current global policy debate. It presents the results of a qualitative study amongst 68 Danish high school students concerning how they perceive, negotiate and control their private sphere when using social media and builds a case for utilizing the results of studies as this to inform the ongoing policy discourses concerning online privacy.


Keywords


Online privacy, public policymaking, youth, social media, Internet, the right to privacy

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v20i3.5568



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